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- tracy6413 - 08-24-2011 07:45 AM

A round-up of the latest health news
!Moderate drinking cuts risk of Alzheimer's - study

Light to moderate social drinking, a glass or two of wine or beer a day, can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to American researchers.

After analysing more than 140 studies dating back to 1977 and involving more than 365,000 people, scientists at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine found that moderate drinkers were 23 percent less likely to develop forms of dementia and cognitive impairment.

Moderate drinking is defined as a maximum of two drinks per day for men and one drink for women.

“It is well accepted that a glass of wine is good for your heart and reduces coronary artery and cardiovascular diseases,” said Edward J. Neafsey, a co-author of the study.

The findings show the moderate alcohol consumption has same effect on the brain.

Wine was more beneficial than beer or spirits, according to the findings published in the journal Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. But the researchers said most studies in the analysis did not distinguish between the different types of alcohol.

But heavy drinking, three to five drinks a day, was associated with a higher risk of dementia.

Neafsey does not recommend non-drinkers to suddenly start drinking, and for people who do drink to enjoy their alcohol in moderation. Exercise, education and a Mediterranean diet can also reduce the risks of developing dementia.

“The key words here are light to moderate drinking,” he said. “The enjoyment of a good meal with friends and glass of wine is a traditional human pleasure that most people enjoy.” - Reuters

Flu vaccine could help sleep disorder sufferers

The sleep condition narcolepsy could be prevented with a flu vaccine, researchers have discovered.

Scientists in China have found those vulnerable to the condition, which causes sufferers to fall asleep unexpectedly, can be protected by a mild flu vaccine. Their research came after the European Medicines Agency recommended banning the use of Pandemrix, a widely used flu vaccine, in children under 20 because of its links with narcolepsy.

The China study has now linked the disorder to flu infection in susceptible individuals and found that use of a flu vaccine other than Pandemrix may protect them. The research looked at 900 patients diagnosed with narcolepsy and found the condition was seasonal, with a peak incidence five to seven months after the peak incidence of flu. Although the study does not prove that flu causes narcolepsy, it shows a strong correlation.

Emmanuel Mignot from Stanford University, California, said: “It is very possible that being vaccinated with a mild vaccine...blocks you from getting a big infection that could increase your risk of narcolepsy.”

Further research was needed, Dr Mignot said. - Jeremy Laurance Health Editor, The Independent

Living alone after heart attack tied to death risk

New York - Living alone after a heart attack is associated with a higher risk of death over the next four years, while a lack of support at home was also linked to a lower quality of life just one year after the attack, according to a study.

While the risk of death one year after a heart attack was about the same among people who lived alone and those who lived with others, after four years the risk of death was about 35 percent higher for people living by themselves, the study in the American Journal of Cardiology said.
A round-up of the latest health news

Moderate drinking cuts risk of Alzheimer's - study

Light to moderate social drinking, a glass or two of wine or beer a day, can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to American researchers.

After analysing more than 140 studies dating back to 1977 and involving more than 365,000 people, scientists at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine found that moderate drinkers were 23 percent less likely to develop forms of dementia and cognitive impairment.

Moderate drinking is defined as a maximum of two drinks per day for men and one drink for women.

“It is well accepted that a glass of wine is good for your heart and reduces coronary artery and cardiovascular diseases,” said Edward J. Neafsey, a co-author of the study.

The findings show the moderate alcohol consumption has same effect on the brain.

Wine was more beneficial than beer or spirits, according to the findings published in the journal Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. But the researchers said most studies in the analysis did not distinguish between the different types of alcohol.

But heavy drinking, three to five drinks a day, was associated with a higher risk of dementia.

Neafsey does not recommend non-drinkers to suddenly start drinking, and for people who do drink to enjoy their alcohol in moderation. Exercise, education and a Mediterranean diet can also reduce the risks of developing dementia.

“The key words here are light to moderate drinking,” he said. “The enjoyment of a good meal with friends and glass of wine is a traditional human pleasure that most people enjoy.” - Reuters

Flu vaccine could help sleep disorder sufferers

The sleep condition narcolepsy could be prevented with a flu vaccine, researchers have discovered.

Scientists in China have found those vulnerable to the condition, which causes sufferers to fall asleep unexpectedly, can be protected by a mild flu vaccine. Their research came after the European Medicines Agency recommended banning the use of Pandemrix, a widely used flu vaccine, in children under 20 because of its links with narcolepsy.

The China study has now linked the disorder to flu infection in susceptible individuals and found that use of a flu vaccine other than Pandemrix may protect them. The research looked at 900 patients diagnosed with narcolepsy and found the condition was seasonal, with a peak incidence five to seven months after the peak incidence of flu. Although the study does not prove that flu causes narcolepsy, it shows a strong correlation.

Emmanuel Mignot from Stanford University, California, said: “It is very possible that being vaccinated with a mild vaccine...blocks you from getting a big infection that could increase your risk of narcolepsy.”

Further research was needed, Dr Mignot said. - Jeremy Laurance Health Editor, The Independent

Living alone after heart attack tied to death risk

New York - Living alone after a heart attack is associated with a higher risk of death over the next four years, while a lack of support at home was also linked to a lower quality of life just one year after the attack, according to a study.

While the risk of death one year after a heart attack was about the same among people who lived alone and those who lived with others, after four years the risk of death was about 35 percent higher for people living by themselves, the study in the American Journal of Cardiology said.


- andrawes76 - 09-21-2011 02:34 AM

can someone edit this and kill the image and link?


- Innkeeper - 04-17-2012 09:41 PM

We have a history of Alzheimer's in our family, so naturally we are interested. Despite all the reasearch on the subject, we have found no better theropy than keeping the brain active. I have memorized a list of over a hundred names that changes constantly and are in four different categories; and I pray for them everyday including some on this board or related to them. At 72 and a half my mind is still in pretty good shape.


- winoweenie - 04-17-2012 10:32 PM

Looks like our new member may have an agenda. So far has opened up 5 VERY old threads. WW